Conway the Machine – God Don’t Make Mistakes: Review

Conway the Machine has organized rhyme schemes and potent lyricism while broadening the transitions from song to song. One of few technical talents that fit him, and his Griselda cohorts, except each, come with different perspectives for style. Conway has brought about greatness on every front, from his ear for production and his masterful writing skills. It’s been the case through his many projects, from album to mixtape, and delivering an innate and hypnotic consistency for fans of lyricism over the more radio-centric sounds. When attempting to bring bangers, he doesn’t stray far from his identity, lyricism; it continues to be a staple of his craft. There’s constant activity on God Don’t Make Mistakes, his major-label debut. There is crisp production from a range of producers, who provide tonal consistency, and there is Conway’s lyricism that never falters.

God Don’t Make Mistakes is like a sucker punch that stops you in your tracks and forces you to sit and listen to Conway the Machine’s verses. More of an introspective composition, we see Conway attacking layers of his person, from confidence to early self-doubt and success. Conway opens the album with visceral confidence on “Lock Load,” featuring Beanie Siegel. Trading bars, Conway and Beanie bring energy and emotional depth to the lyricism. Conway raps: “Momma start thinkin’ I’m crazy, baby mama think I’m nuts/Ever since them n****s shot me, I just stopped givin’ a fuck,” in the first verse, using people in his life to define his attitudes as he progresses to rap more poignantly violent bars. It’s a softer percussion-based production, focusing on the atmosphere as the two add weight with their delivery. 

Unfortunately, there is a minor drawback in “Lock Load” – it happens twice – the audio levels of some of the features drown them out. It may bother some, but returning to piece the bars together with the production is part of its greatness. Beanie Siegel’s verse is audible in decibels, and it’s the same with TI on “Wild Chapters.” There is some disappointment since there are other tracks that have a proper polish for every artist – whether they are heavyweights like Lil Wayne & Rick Ross or underground rappers like 7xvethegenius, everyone delivers and make these tracks well rounded. It feels like those verses lacked that second look, but they are just blemishes on an otherwise outstanding album. 

However, it’s more than just a collection of fantastic verses and performances from Conway and the features that buoy God Don’t Make Mistakes to greatness. The producers bring an individualized identity on each track while keeping you invested, even when some songs don’t always work, like “Wild Chapters” with TI. It has agency, but it doesn’t land as strong as the others, specifically “Tear Gas,” “Guilty,” “Piano Love,” and “Chanel Pearls.” “Guilty” and “Piano Love” stand out as Conway’s solo performances, with the latter seeing Conway flexing eloquently over a piano-laced production from The Alchemist. The former takes the piano keys and gospel backing vocals to complement Conway’s introspective rap about a shootout that left him with Bell’s Palsy. It’s a testament to Conway’s talent. He breaks down barriers, bypassing his swagger simply to keep it real within less loud drum-banging productions.

With “Chanel Pearls,” well, it is an essential favorite – it has one the better productions on the album; the subtle simplicity gives it a sticky drum line, a 1-2-3 punch that allows an uproot from other instruments to build upon it. Piano keys return with elegance, particularly boosting Jill Scott’s rap verse and chorus. It tells a remarkable story – storytelling being a key talent – between two lovers, making it feel unique compared to others that do similarly. It roots itself into the emotions of the two, taking it to a personal level, allowing us to visualize the musical back and forth in our minds. 

God Don’t Make Mistakes comes with surprises. We continue to hear Conway the Machine go toe-to-toe with rap’s heavyweights; we hear him adapting his technical and writing skills to the content he wants to reflect on the album. What Conway expresses is his true self, reaffirming the notion of God accepting the flawed like those deemed “clean.” The constant motion of the album allows it to have a steady run despite its minor issues.

Rating: 8.5 out of 10.

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